Publications
chap 1_LowDensity

List of Main Publications

2017

  • [DOI] C. Demene, J. Baranger, M. Bernal, C. Delanoe, S. Auvin, V. Biran, M. Alison, J. Mairesse, E. Harribaud, M. Pernot, M. Tanter, and O. Baud, “Functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity in human newborns,” Science Translational Medicine, vol. 9, iss. 411, p. eaah6756+, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14458054,
        author = {Demene, Charlie and Baranger, J'{e}rome and Bernal, Miguel and Delanoe, Catherine and Auvin, St'{e}phane and Biran, Val'{e}rie and Alison, Marianne and Mairesse, J'{e}rome and Harribaud, Elisabeth and Pernot, Mathieu and Tanter, Mickael and Baud, Olivier},
        citeulike-article-id = {14458054},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aah6756},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/411/eaah6756.abstract},
        citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/411/eaah6756.full.pdf},
        citeulike-linkout-3 = {http://view.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29021168},
        citeulike-linkout-4 = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=29021168},
        day = {11},
        doi = {10.1126/scitranslmed.aah6756},
        issn = {1946-6242},
        journal = {Science Translational Medicine},
        month = oct,
        number = {411},
        pages = {eaah6756+},
        pmid = {29021168},
        posted-at = {2017-10-13 21:42:10},
        priority = {2},
        publisher = {American Association for the Advancement of Science},
        title = {Functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity in human newborns},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aah6756},
        volume = {9},
        year = {2017}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Imbault, D. Chauvet, J. Gennisson, L. Capelle, and M. Tanter, “Intraoperative Functional Ultrasound Imaging of Human Brain Activity,” Scientific Reports, vol. 7, iss. 1, p. 7304+, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{Imbault2017,
        abstract = {The functional mapping of brain activity is essential to perform optimal glioma surgery and to minimize the risk of postoperative deficits. We introduce a new, portable neuroimaging modality of the human brain based on functional ultrasound ({fUS}) for deep functional cortical mapping. Using plane-wave transmissions at an ultrafast frame rate (1 {kHz}), {fUS} is performed during surgery to measure transient changes in cerebral blood volume with a high spatiotemporal resolution (250 µm, 1 ms). {fUS} identifies, maps and differentiates regions of brain activation during task-evoked cortical responses within the depth of a sulcus in both awake and anaesthetized patients.},
        author = {Imbault, Marion and Chauvet, Dorian and Gennisson, Jean-Luc and Capelle, Laurent and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {14409086},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-06474-8},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-06474-8},
        doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-06474-8},
        issn = {2045-2322},
        journal = {Scientific Reports},
        number = {1},
        pages = {7304+},
        posted-at = {2017-08-05 14:40:39},
        priority = {5},
        title = {Intraoperative Functional Ultrasound Imaging of Human Brain Activity},
        url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-06474-8},
        volume = {7},
        year = {2017}
    }
  • [DOI] E. Tiran, J. Ferrier, T. Deffieux, J. Gennisson, S. Pezet, Z. Lenkei, and M. Tanter, “Transcranial Functional Ultrasound Imaging in Freely Moving Awake Mice and Anesthetized Young Rats without Contrast Agent,” Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14354810,
        author = {Tiran, Elodie and Ferrier, J'{e}r'{e}my and Deffieux, Thomas and Gennisson, Jean-Luc and Pezet, Sophie and Lenkei, Zsolt and Tanter, Micka"{e}l},
        citeulike-article-id = {14354810},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2017.03.011},
        doi = {10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2017.03.011},
        issn = {03015629},
        journal = {Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology},
        month = may,
        posted-at = {2017-05-10 06:46:44},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Transcranial Functional Ultrasound Imaging in Freely Moving Awake Mice and Anesthetized Young Rats without Contrast Agent},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2017.03.011},
        year = {2017}
    }
  • [DOI] R. L. Rungta, B. Osmanski, D. Boido, M. Tanter, and S. Charpak, “Light controls cerebral blood flow in naive animals,” Nature Communications, vol. 8, p. 14191+, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14290357,
        author = {Rungta, Ravi L. and Osmanski, Bruno-F'{e}lix and Boido, Davide and Tanter, Mickael and Charpak, Serge},
        citeulike-article-id = {14290357},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14191},
        day = {31},
        doi = {10.1038/ncomms14191},
        issn = {2041-1723},
        journal = {Nature Communications},
        month = jan,
        pages = {14191+},
        posted-at = {2017-03-02 09:59:03},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Light controls cerebral blood flow in naive animals},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14191},
        volume = {8},
        year = {2017}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Gesnik, K. Blaize, T. Deffieux, J. Gennisson, J. Sahel, M. Fink, S. Picaud, and M. Tanter, “3D Functional Ultrasound Imaging of the cerebral visual system in rodents,” NeuroImage, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14290348,
        abstract = {{3D} functional imaging of the whole brain activity during visual task is a challenging task in rodents due to the complex tri-dimensional shape of involved brain regions and the fine spatial and temporal resolutions required to reveal the visual tract. By coupling functional ultrasound ({fUS}) imaging with a translational motorized stage and an episodic visual stimulation device, we managed to accurately map and to recover the activity of the visual cortices, the Superior Colliculus ({SC}) and the Lateral Geniculate Nuclei ({LGN}) in {3D}. Cerebral Blood Volume ({CBV}) responses during visual stimuli were found to be highly correlated with the visual stimulus time profile in visual cortices (r = 0.6), {SC} (r = 0.7) and {LGN} (r = 0.7). These responses were found dependent on flickering frequency and contrast, and optimal stimulus parameters for largest {CBV} increases were obtained. In particular, increasing the flickering frequency higher than 7 Hz revealed a decrease of visual cortices response while the {SC} response was preserved. Finally, cross-correlation between {CBV} signals exhibited significant delays (d = 0.35 s +/− 0.1 s) between blood volume response in {SC} and visual cortices in response to our visual stimulus. These results emphasize the interest of {fUS} imaging as a whole brain neuroimaging modality for brain vision studies in rodent models.},
        author = {Gesnik, Marc and Blaize, Kevin and Deffieux, Thomas and Gennisson, Jean-Luc and Sahel, Jos'{e}-Alain and Fink, Mathias and Picaud, Serge and Tanter, Micka"{e}l},
        citeulike-article-id = {14290348},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.071},
        doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.071},
        issn = {10538119},
        journal = {NeuroImage},
        month = feb,
        posted-at = {2017-03-02 09:46:49},
        priority = {2},
        title = {{3D} Functional Ultrasound Imaging of the cerebral visual system in rodents},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.071},
        year = {2017}
    }

2016

  • [DOI] L. Sieu, A. Bergel, E. Tiran, T. Deffieux, M. Pernot, J. Gennisson, M. Tanter, and I. Cohen, “Mesure simultanée des dynamiques neuronale et vasculaire chez l’animal mobile,” médecine/sciences, vol. 32, iss. 5, pp. 444-447, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14290353,
        author = {Sieu, Lim-Anna and Bergel, Antoine and Tiran, Elodie and Deffieux, Thomas and Pernot, Mathieu and Gennisson, Jean-Luc and Tanter, Micka"{e}l and Cohen, Ivan},
        citeulike-article-id = {14290353},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/medsci/20163205006},
        day = {25},
        doi = {10.1051/medsci/20163205006},
        issn = {0767-0974},
        journal = {m'{e}decine/sciences},
        month = may,
        number = {5},
        pages = {444--447},
        posted-at = {2017-03-02 09:55:33},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Mesure simultan'{e}e des dynamiques neuronale et vasculaire chez l'animal mobile},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/medsci/20163205006},
        volume = {32},
        year = {2016}
    }
  • [DOI] A. R. Batista Novais, H. Pham, Y. Van de Looij, M. Bernal, J. Mairesse, E. Zana-Taieb, M. Colella, P. Jarreau, J. Pansiot, F. Dumont, S. Sizonenko, P. Gressens, C. Charriaut-Marlangue, M. Tanter, C. Demene, D. Vaiman, and O. Baud, “Transcriptomic regulations in oligodendroglial and microglial cells related to brain damage following fetal growth restriction,” Glia, p. n/a, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14151402,
        abstract = {Fetal growth restriction ({FGR}) is a major complication of human pregnancy, frequently resulting from placental vascular diseases and prenatal malnutrition, and is associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes throughout life. However, the mechanisms linking poor fetal growth and neurocognitive impairment are unclear. Here, we aimed to correlate changes in gene expression induced by {FGR} in rats and abnormal cerebral white matter maturation, brain microstructure, and cortical connectivity in vivo. We investigated a model of {FGR} induced by low-protein-diet malnutrition between embryonic day 0 and birth using an interdisciplinary approach combining advanced brain imaging, in vivo connectivity, microarray analysis of sorted oligodendroglial and microglial cells and histology. We show that myelination and brain function are both significantly altered in our model of {FGR}. These alterations, detected first in the white matter on magnetic resonance imaging significantly reduced cortical connectivity as assessed by ultrafast ultrasound imaging. Fetal growth retardation was found associated with white matter dysmaturation as shown by the immunohistochemical profiles and microarrays analyses. Strikingly, transcriptomic and gene network analyses reveal not only a myelination deficit in growth-restricted pups, but also the extensive deregulation of genes controlling neuroinflammation and the cell cycle in both oligodendrocytes and microglia. Our findings shed new light on the cellular and gene regulatory mechanisms mediating brain structural and functional defects in malnutrition-induced {FGR}, and suggest, for the first time, a neuroinflammatory basis for the poor neurocognitive outcome observed in growth-restricted human infants. {GLIA} 2016},
        author = {Batista Novais, Aline R. and Pham, Hoa and Van de Looij, Yohan and Bernal, Miguel and Mairesse, Jerome and Zana-Taieb, Elodie and Colella, Marina and Jarreau, Pierre-Henri and Pansiot, Julien and Dumont, Florent and Sizonenko, St'{e}phane and Gressens, Pierre and Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane and Tanter, Mickael and Demene, Charlie and Vaiman, Daniel and Baud, Olivier},
        citeulike-article-id = {14151402},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/glia.23079},
        day = {1},
        doi = {10.1002/glia.23079},
        journal = {Glia},
        month = sep,
        pages = {n/a},
        posted-at = {2016-10-04 08:13:27},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Transcriptomic regulations in oligodendroglial and microglial cells related to brain damage following fetal growth restriction},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/glia.23079},
        year = {2016}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Demené, E. Tiran, L. Sieu, A. Bergel, J. L. Gennisson, M. Pernot, T. Deffieux, I. Cohen, and M. Tanter, “4D microvascular imaging based on ultrafast Doppler tomography,” NeuroImage, vol. 127, pp. 472-483, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13847682,
        abstract = { We describe a new {4D} microvascular imaging technique. Combination of ultrasound ultrafast Doppler and tomographic reconstruction for {3D} imaging The technique reaches 100 ^{I}¼m resolution and is sensitive to very slow blood flow (1 mm/s). {4D} capabilities during one cardiac cycle It opens the way to {4D} imaging on awake and moving animals. {4D} ultrasound microvascular imaging was demonstrated by applying ultrafast Doppler tomography ({UFD}-T) to the imaging of brain hemodynamics in rodents. In vivo real-time imaging of the rat brain was performed using ultrasonic plane wave transmissions at very high frame rates (18,000 frames per second). Such ultrafast frame rates allow for highly sensitive and wide-field-of-view {2D} Doppler imaging of blood vessels far beyond conventional ultrasonography. Voxel anisotropy (100 ^{I}¼m × 100 ^{I}¼m × 500 ^{I}¼m) was corrected for by using a tomographic approach, which consisted of ultrafast acquisitions repeated for different imaging plane orientations over multiple cardiac cycles. {UFT}-D allows for {4D} dynamic microvascular imaging of deep-seated vasculature (up to 20 mm) with a very high {4D} resolution (respectively 100 ^{I}¼m × 100 ^{I}¼m × 100 ^{I}¼m and 10 ms) and high sensitivity to flow in small vessels (> 1 mm/s) for a whole-brain imaging technique without requiring any contrast agent. {4D} ultrasound microvascular imaging in vivo could become a valuable tool for the study of brain hemodynamics, such as cerebral flow autoregulation or vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke recovery, and, more generally, tumor vasculature response to therapeutic treatment. },
        author = {Demen'{e}, Charlie and Tiran, Elodie and Sieu, Lim-Anna and Bergel, Antoine and Gennisson, Jean L. and Pernot, Mathieu and Deffieux, Thomas and Cohen, Ivan and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13847682},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.014},
        doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.014},
        issn = {10538119},
        journal = {NeuroImage},
        month = feb,
        pages = {472--483},
        posted-at = {2015-11-26 22:13:16},
        priority = {2},
        title = {{4D} microvascular imaging based on ultrafast Doppler tomography},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.014},
        volume = {127},
        year = {2016}
    }

2015

  • [DOI] D. Chauvet, M. Imbault, L. Capelle, C. Demene, M. Mossad, C. Karachi, A. L. Boch, J. L. Gennisson, and M. Tanter, “In Vivo Measurement of Brain Tumor Elasticity Using Intraoperative Shear Wave Elastography,” Ultraschall in der Medizin – European Journal of Ultrasound, vol. 37, iss. 06, pp. 584-590, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:14290349,
        author = {Chauvet, D. and Imbault, M. and Capelle, L. and Demene, C. and Mossad, M. and Karachi, C. and Boch, A. L. and Gennisson, J. L. and Tanter, M.},
        citeulike-article-id = {14290349},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1399152},
        day = {15},
        doi = {10.1055/s-0034-1399152},
        issn = {0172-4614},
        journal = {Ultraschall in der Medizin - European Journal of Ultrasound},
        month = apr,
        number = {06},
        pages = {584--590},
        posted-at = {2017-03-02 09:50:19},
        priority = {2},
        title = {In Vivo Measurement of Brain Tumor Elasticity Using Intraoperative Shear Wave Elastography},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1399152},
        volume = {37},
        year = {2015}
    }
  • [DOI] Y. Desailly, J. Pierre, O. Couture, and M. Tanter, “Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy,” Physics in Medicine and Biology, vol. 60, iss. 22, pp. 8723-8740, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13854783,
        author = {Desailly, Yann and Pierre, Juliette and Couture, Olivier and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13854783},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/60/22/8723},
        day = {21},
        doi = {10.1088/0031-9155/60/22/8723},
        issn = {0031-9155},
        journal = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
        month = nov,
        number = {22},
        pages = {8723--8740},
        posted-at = {2015-12-05 10:11:30},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/60/22/8723},
        volume = {60},
        year = {2015}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Errico, J. Pierre, S. Pezet, Y. Desailly, Z. Lenkei, O. Couture, and M. Tanter, “Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy for deep super-resolution vascular imaging,” Nature, vol. 527, iss. 7579, pp. 499-502, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13846894,
        abstract = {Non-invasive imaging deep into organs at microscopic scales remains an open quest in biomedical imaging. Although optical microscopy is still limited to surface imaging owing to optical wave diffusion and fast decorrelation in tissue, revolutionary approaches such as fluorescence photo-activated localization microscopy led to a striking increase in resolution by more than an order of magnitude in the last decade. In contrast with optics, ultrasonic waves propagate deep into organs without losing their coherence and are much less affected by in vivo decorrelation processes. However, their resolution is impeded by the fundamental limits of diffraction, which impose a long-standing trade-off between resolution and penetration. This limits clinical and preclinical ultrasound imaging to a sub-millimetre scale. Here we demonstrate in vivo that ultrasound imaging at ultrafast frame rates (more than 500 frames per second) provides an analogue to optical localization microscopy by capturing the transient signal decorrelation of contrast agentsinert gas microbubbles. Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy allowed both non-invasive sub-wavelength structural imaging and haemodynamic quantification of rodent cerebral microvessels (less than ten micrometres in diameter) more than ten millimetres below the tissue surface, leading to transcranial whole-brain imaging within short acquisition times (tens of seconds). After intravenous injection, single echoes from individual microbubbles were detected through ultrafast imaging. Their localization, not limited by diffraction, was accumulated over 75,000 images, yielding 1,000,000 events per coronal plane and statistically independent pixels of ten micrometres in size. Precise temporal tracking of microbubble positions allowed us to extract accurately in-plane velocities of the blood flow with a large dynamic range (from one millimetre per second to several centimetres per second). These results pave the way for deep non-invasive microscopy in animals and humans using ultrasound. We anticipate that ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy may become an invaluable tool for the fundamental understanding and diagnostics of various disease processes that modify the microvascular blood flow, such as cancer, stroke and arteriosclerosis.},
        author = {Errico, Claudia and Pierre, Juliette and Pezet, Sophie and Desailly, Yann and Lenkei, Zsolt and Couture, Olivier and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13846894},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature16066},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature16066},
        day = {26},
        doi = {10.1038/nature16066},
        issn = {0028-0836},
        journal = {Nature},
        month = nov,
        number = {7579},
        pages = {499--502},
        posted-at = {2015-12-04 19:17:53},
        priority = {2},
        publisher = {Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.},
        title = {Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy for deep super-resolution vascular imaging},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature16066},
        volume = {527},
        year = {2015}
    }
  • [DOI] E. Tiran, T. Deffieux, M. Correia, D. Maresca, B. Osmanski, L. Sieu, A. Bergel, I. Cohen, M. Pernot, and M. Tanter, “Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging,” Physics in Medicine and Biology, vol. 60, iss. 21, pp. 8549-8566, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13816215,
        author = {Tiran, Elodie and Deffieux, Thomas and Correia, Mafalda and Maresca, David and Osmanski, Bruno-Felix and Sieu, Lim-Anna and Bergel, Antoine and Cohen, Ivan and Pernot, Mathieu and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13816215},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/60/21/8549},
        day = {07},
        doi = {10.1088/0031-9155/60/21/8549},
        issn = {0031-9155},
        journal = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
        month = nov,
        number = {21},
        pages = {8549--8566},
        posted-at = {2015-10-28 21:49:49},
        priority = {5},
        title = {Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/60/21/8549},
        volume = {60},
        year = {2015}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Errico, B. Osmanski, S. Pezet, O. Couture, Z. Lenkei, and M. Tanter, “Transcranial functional ultrasound imaging of the brain using microbubble-enhanced ultrasensitive Doppler,” NeuroImage, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13795341,
        abstract = { We combined ultrafast sensitive Doppler with contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. We retrieved highly-resolved neurovascular transcranial maps with contrast agents. The presence of microbubbles compensates for the attenuation from the skull. {fUS} is sensitive to the local hyperemia in the rat brain through the skull with microbubbles. Transcranial {fUS} imaging allows non-invasive functional brain studies in rodents. Functional ultrasound ({fUS}) is a novel neuroimaging technique, based on high-sensitivity ultrafast Doppler imaging of cerebral blood volume, capable of measuring brain activation and connectivity in rodents with high spatiotemporal resolution (100 ^{I}¼m, 1 ms). However, the skull attenuates acoustic waves, so {fUS} in rats currently requires craniotomy or a thinned-skull window. Here we propose a non-invasive approach by enhancing the {fUS} signal with a contrast agent, inert gas microbubbles. Plane-wave illumination of the brain at high frame rate (500 Hz compounded sequence with three tilted plane waves, {PRF} = {1500Hz} with a 128 element 15 {MHz} linear transducer), yields highly-resolved neurovascular maps. We compared {fUS} imaging performance through the intact skull bone (transcranial {fUS}) versus a thinned-skull window in the same animal. First, we show that the vascular network of the adult rat brain can be imaged transcranially only after a bolus intravenous injection of microbubbles, which leads to a 9 {dB} gain in the contrast-to-tissue ratio. Next, we demonstrate that functional increase in the blood volume of the primary sensory cortex after targeted electrical-evoked stimulations of the sciatic nerve is observable transcranially in presence of contrast agent, with high reproducibility (Pearson's coefficient "{I} = 0.7 ± 0.1, p = 0.85). Our work demonstrates that the combination of ultrafast Doppler imaging and injection of contrast agent allows non-invasive functional brain imaging through the intact skull bone in rats. These results should ease non-invasive longitudinal studies in rodents and open a promising perspective for the adoption of highly resolved {fUS} approaches for the adult human brain.},
        author = {Errico, Claudia and Osmanski, Bruno-F'{e}lix and Pezet, Sophie and Couture, Olivier and Lenkei, Zsolt and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13795341},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.037},
        doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.037},
        issn = {10538119},
        journal = {NeuroImage},
        month = sep,
        posted-at = {2015-10-05 21:23:00},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Transcranial functional ultrasound imaging of the brain using microbubble-enhanced ultrasensitive Doppler},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.037},
        year = {2015}
    }
  • [DOI] L. Sieu, A. Bergel, E. Tiran, T. Deffieux, M. Pernot, J. Gennisson, M. Tanter, and I. Cohen, “EEG and functional ultrasound imaging in mobile rats,” Nat Meth, vol. advance online publication, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13698687,
        author = {Sieu, Lim-Anna and Bergel, Antoine and Tiran, Elodie and Deffieux, Thomas and Pernot, Mathieu and Gennisson, Jean-Luc and Tanter, Mickael and Cohen, Ivan},
        citeulike-article-id = {13698687},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.3506},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.3506},
        day = {3},
        doi = {10.1038/nmeth.3506},
        journal = {Nat Meth},
        month = aug,
        posted-at = {2015-08-09 19:00:30},
        priority = {5},
        publisher = {Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.},
        title = {{EEG} and functional ultrasound imaging in mobile rats},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.3506},
        volume = {advance online publication},
        year = {2015}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Demene, T. Deffieux, M. Pernot, B. Osmanski, V. Biran, J. Gennisson, L. Sieu, A. Bergel, S. Franqui, J. Correas, I. Cohen, O. Baud, and M. Tanter, “Spatiotemporal clutter filtering of ultrafast ultrasound data highly increases Doppler and fUltrasound sensitivity,” IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, vol. 1, iss. 1, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13608278,
        abstract = {Ultrafast ultrasonic imaging is a rapidly developing field based on the unfocused transmission of plane or diverging ultrasound waves. This recent approach to ultrasound imaging leads to a large increase in raw ultrasound data available per acquisition. Bigger synchronous ultrasound imaging datasets can be exploited in order to strongly improve the discrimination between tissue and blood motion in the field of Doppler imaging. Here we propose a spatiotemporal singular value decomposition clutter rejection of ultrasonic data acquired at ultrafast frame rate. The singular value decomposition ({SVD}) takes benefits of the different features of tissue and blood motion in terms of spatiotemporal coherence and strongly outperforms conventional clutter rejection filters based on high pass temporal filtering. Whereas classical clutter filters operate on the temporal dimension only, {SVD} clutter filtering provides up to a four-dimensional approach ({3D} in space and {1D} in time). We demonstrate the performance of {SVD} clutter filtering with a flow phantom study that showed an increased performance compared to other classical filters (better contrast to noise ratio with tissue motion between 1 and 10mm/s and axial blood flow as low as 2.6mm/s). {SVD} clutter filtering revealed previously undetected blood flows such as microvascular networks or blood flows corrupted by significant tissue or probe motion artifacts. We report in vivo applications including small animal {fUltrasound} brain imaging (blood flow detection limit of 0.5mm/s) and several clinical imaging cases, such as neonate brain imaging, liver or kidney Doppler imaging.},
        author = {Demene, Charlie and Deffieux, Thomas and Pernot, Mathieu and Osmanski, Bruno-Felix and Biran, Valerie and Gennisson, Jean-Luc and Sieu, Lim-Anna and Bergel, Antoine and Franqui, Stephanie and Correas, Jean-Michel and Cohen, Ivan and Baud, Olivier and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13608278},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMI.2015.2428634},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tmi.2015.2428634},
        citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=7098422},
        day = {10},
        doi = {10.1109/TMI.2015.2428634},
        institution = {Charlie Demene is with the Institut Langevin, CNRS UMR 7587, INSERM U979, ESPCI ParisTech, Paris 75005, France. (e-mail: charlie.demene@espci.fr).},
        issn = {0278-0062},
        journal = {IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging},
        month = jun,
        number = {1},
        posted-at = {2015-05-11 13:04:34},
        priority = {2},
        publisher = {IEEE},
        title = {Spatiotemporal clutter filtering of ultrafast ultrasound data highly increases Doppler and {fUltrasound} sensitivity},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMI.2015.2428634},
        volume = {1},
        year = {2015}
    }

2014

  • [DOI] B. Osmanski, S. Pezet, A. Ricobaraza, Z. Lenkei, and M. Tanter, “Functional ultrasound imaging of intrinsic connectivity in the living rat brain with high spatiotemporal resolution,” Nature Communications, vol. 5, p. 5023+, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13381806,
        author = {Osmanski, Bruno-F'{e}lix and Pezet, Sophie and Ricobaraza, Ana and Lenkei, Zsolt and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13381806},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6023},
        day = {3},
        doi = {10.1038/ncomms6023},
        issn = {2041-1723},
        journal = {Nature Communications},
        month = oct,
        pages = {5023+},
        posted-at = {2014-10-03 20:54:05},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Functional ultrasound imaging of intrinsic connectivity in the living rat brain with high spatiotemporal resolution},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6023},
        volume = {5},
        year = {2014}
    }
  • [DOI] B. F. Osmanski, C. Martin, G. Montaldo, P. Lanièce, F. Pain, M. Tanter, and H. Gurden, “Functional ultrasound imaging reveals different odor-evoked patterns of vascular activity in the main olfactory bulb and the anterior piriform cortex,” NeuroImage, vol. 95, pp. 176-184, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353774,
        author = {Osmanski, B. F. and Martin, C. and Montaldo, G. and Lani`{e}ce, P. and Pain, F. and Tanter, M. and Gurden, H.},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353774},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.03.054},
        doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.03.054},
        isbn = {10538119},
        issn = {10538119},
        journal = {NeuroImage},
        month = jul,
        pages = {176--184},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 16:41:53},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Functional ultrasound imaging reveals different odor-evoked patterns of vascular activity in the main olfactory bulb and the anterior piriform cortex},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.03.054},
        volume = {95},
        year = {2014}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Tanter and M. Fink, “Ultrafast imaging in biomedical ultrasound.,” IEEE transactions on ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, and frequency control, vol. 61, iss. 1, pp. 102-119, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353457,
        abstract = {Although the use of ultrasonic plane-wave transmissions rather than line-per-line focused beam transmissions has been long studied in research, clinical application of this technology was only recently made possible through developments in graphical processing unit ({GPU})-based platforms. Far beyond a technological breakthrough, the use of plane or diverging wave transmissions enables attainment of ultrafast frame rates (typically faster than 1000 frames per second) over a large field of view. This concept has also inspired the emergence of completely novel imaging modes which are valuable for ultrasound-based screening, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring. In this review article, we present the basic principles and implementation of ultrafast imaging. In particular, present and future applications of ultrafast imaging in biomedical ultrasound are illustrated and discussed.},
        author = {Tanter, Mickael and Fink, Mathias},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353457},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2014.6689779},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://view.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24402899},
        citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=24402899},
        doi = {10.1109/TUFFC.2014.6689779},
        issn = {1525-8955},
        journal = {IEEE transactions on ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, and frequency control},
        month = jan,
        number = {1},
        pages = {102--119},
        pmid = {24402899},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 10:16:03},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Ultrafast imaging in biomedical ultrasound.},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2014.6689779},
        volume = {61},
        year = {2014}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Demene, M. Pernot, V. Biran, M. Alison, M. Fink, O. Baud, and M. Tanter, “Ultrafast Doppler reveals the mapping of cerebral vascular resistivity in neonates,” J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, vol. 34, iss. 6, pp. 1009-1017, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353456,
        author = {Demene, Charlie and Pernot, Mathieu and Biran, Valerie and Alison, Marianne and Fink, Mathias and Baud, Olivier and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353456},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2014.49},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm201449a},
        doi = {10.1038/jcbfm.2014.49},
        journal = {J Cereb Blood Flow Metab},
        month = jun,
        number = {6},
        pages = {1009--1017},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 10:15:29},
        priority = {2},
        publisher = {International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, Inc.},
        title = {Ultrafast Doppler reveals the mapping of cerebral vascular resistivity in neonates},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2014.49},
        volume = {34},
        year = {2014}
    }

2013

  • [DOI] E. Mace, G. Montaldo, B. Osmanski, I. Cohen, M. Fink, and M. Tanter, “Functional ultrasound imaging of the brain: theory and basic principles.,” IEEE transactions on ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, and frequency control, vol. 60, iss. 3, pp. 492-506, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353455,
        abstract = {Hemodynamic changes in the brain are often used as surrogates of neuronal activity to infer the loci of brain activity. A major limitation of conventional Doppler ultrasound for the imaging of these changes is that it is not sensitive enough to detect the blood flow in small vessels where the major part of the hemodynamic response occurs. Here, we present a {μDoppler} ultrasound method able to detect and map the cerebral blood volume ({CBV}) over the entire brain with an important increase in sensitivity. This method is based on imaging the brain at an ultrafast frame rate (1 {kHz}) using compounded plane wave emissions. A theoretical model demonstrates that the gain in sensitivity of the {μDoppler} method is due to the combination of 1) the high signal-to-noise ratio of the gray scale images, resulting from the synthetic compounding of backscattered echoes; and 2) the extensive signal averaging enabled by the high temporal sampling of ultrafast frame rates. This {μDoppler} imaging is performed in vivo on trepanned rats without the use of contrast agents. The resulting images reveal detailed maps of the rat brain vascularization with an acquisition time as short as 320 ms per slice. This new method is the basis for a real-time functional ultrasound ({fUS}) imaging of the brain.},
        author = {Mace, Emilie and Montaldo, Gabriel and Osmanski, Bruno-Felix and Cohen, Ivan and Fink, Mathias and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353455},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2013.2592},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://view.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23475916},
        citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=23475916},
        doi = {10.1109/TUFFC.2013.2592},
        issn = {1525-8955},
        journal = {IEEE transactions on ultrasonics, ferroelectrics, and frequency control},
        month = mar,
        number = {3},
        pages = {492--506},
        pmid = {23475916},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 10:14:29},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Functional ultrasound imaging of the brain: theory and basic principles.},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TUFFC.2013.2592},
        volume = {60},
        year = {2013}
    }

2012

  • [DOI] B. Osmanski, M. Pernot, G. Montaldo, A. Bel, E. Messas, and M. Tanter, “Ultrafast Doppler imaging of blood flow dynamics in the myocardium.,” IEEE transactions on medical imaging, vol. 31, iss. 8, pp. 1661-1668, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353454,
        abstract = {Imaging intramyocardial vascular flows in real-time could strongly help to achieve better diagnostic of cardiovascular diseases. To date, no standard imaging modality allows describing accurately myocardial blood flow dynamics with good spatial and temporal resolution. We recently introduced a novel ultrasonic Doppler imaging technique based on compounded plane waves transmissions at ultrafast frame rate. The high sensitivity of this ultrafast Doppler technique permits to image the intramyocardial blood flow and its dynamics. A dedicated demodulation-filtering process is implemented to compensate for the large tissue velocity of the myocardium during the cardiac cycle. A signed power Doppler processing provides the discrimination between arterial and venous flows. Experiments were performed in vivo in a large animal open chest model ( N = 5 sheep) using a conventional ultrasonic probe placed at the surface of the heart. Results show the capability of the technique to image intramyocardial vascular flows in normal physiological conditions with good spatial (200 μm) and temporal resolution (10 ms). Flow dynamics over the cardiac cycle were investigated and the imaging method demonstrated a phase opposition of flow waveforms between arterial and venous flows. Finally, ultrafast Doppler combined with tissue motion compensation was found able to reveal vascular flow disruption in ischemic regions during occlusion of the main diagonal coronary artery.},
        author = {Osmanski, Bruno-Felix and Pernot, Mathieu and Montaldo, Gabriel and Bel, Alain and Messas, Emmanuel and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353454},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMI.2012.2203316},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://view.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22717520},
        citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=22717520},
        doi = {10.1109/TMI.2012.2203316},
        issn = {1558-254X},
        journal = {IEEE transactions on medical imaging},
        month = aug,
        number = {8},
        pages = {1661--1668},
        pmid = {22717520},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 10:13:54},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Ultrafast Doppler imaging of blood flow dynamics in the myocardium.},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMI.2012.2203316},
        volume = {31},
        year = {2012}
    }

2011

  • [DOI] J. Bercoff, G. Montaldo, T. Loupas, D. Savery, F. Meziere, M. Fink, and M. Tanter, “Ultrafast compound doppler imaging: providing full blood flow characterization,” Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 58, iss. 1, pp. 134-147, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353497,
        author = {Bercoff, J. and Montaldo, G. and Loupas, T. and Savery, D. and Meziere, F. and Fink, M. and Tanter, M.},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353497},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tuffc.2011.1780},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5688407},
        doi = {10.1109/tuffc.2011.1780},
        institution = {R&D, Super-Sonic Imagine, Aix-en-Provence, France},
        issn = {0885-3010},
        journal = {Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on},
        month = jan,
        number = {1},
        pages = {134--147},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 10:51:23},
        priority = {2},
        publisher = {IEEE},
        title = {Ultrafast compound doppler imaging: providing full blood flow characterization},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tuffc.2011.1780},
        volume = {58},
        year = {2011}
    }
  • [DOI] E. Macé, G. Montaldo, I. Cohen, M. Baulac, M. Fink, and M. Tanter, “Functional ultrasound imaging of the brain.,” Nature methods, vol. 8, iss. 8, pp. 662-664, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{citeulike:13353451,
        abstract = {We present functional ultrasound ({fUS}), a method for imaging transient changes in blood volume in the whole brain at better spatiotemporal resolution than with other functional brain imaging modalities. {fUS} uses plane-wave illumination at high frame rate and can measure blood volumes in smaller vessels than previous ultrasound methods. {fUS} identifies regions of brain activation and was used to image whisker-evoked cortical and thalamic responses and the propagation of epileptiform seizures in the rat brain.},
        author = {Mac'{e}, Emilie and Montaldo, Gabriel and Cohen, Ivan and Baulac, Michel and Fink, Mathias and Tanter, Mickael},
        citeulike-article-id = {13353451},
        citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.1641},
        citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://view.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21725300},
        citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=21725300},
        doi = {10.1038/nmeth.1641},
        issn = {1548-7105},
        journal = {Nature methods},
        month = aug,
        number = {8},
        pages = {662--664},
        pmid = {21725300},
        posted-at = {2014-09-09 10:13:06},
        priority = {2},
        title = {Functional ultrasound imaging of the brain.},
        url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.1641},
        volume = {8},
        year = {2011}
    }